A Guide to Navigating Sex in the Contact Improvisation Culture for those in Positions of Power by Kathleen Rea

I wrote this article for members of the contact improvisation community who have positions of power within their community.  Their power can derive from being a teacher or organiser, which is a pretty clear leadership role. But sometimes, even if someone hasn't chosen a direct leadership role, they still may have power and influence as a result of the dominant culture giving them power due to certain defining characteristics. For example, a tall, athletic, good-looking young man who does really fancy lifts will often be given "rock star" status, whether he chooses it or not (or is even aware of it). Or a friendly older person who has been going to the jam forever may be seen as a "guru" or "caretaker of the space", even if they are not a teacher. Let’s say you are in a position of power and there is someone at a jam or class that you are attracted to. In this post-#metoo era how should you proceed?

Myths to Break Down: Moving Toward Ethical Communication and Ethical Sexuality in Contact Improvisation by Sarah Gottlieb

Here is an article by Sarah Gottlieb that was published on Contact Improvisation Blog (contactimprovblog.com) Myths to Break Down: Moving Toward Ethical Communication and Ethical Sexuality in Contact Improvisation #1: It makes people uncomfortable to talk about boundary setting and sexuality right before dancing together. There is an idea that talking about boundaries, sexuality, or... Continue Reading →

A Compendium of CI Jam Guidelines from around the world

Thank you to Benjamin Pierce for creating a google doc where the Contact Dance Improvisation worldwide community can gather resources. A Compendium of CI Jam Guidelines from around the world This collection of links to guidelines and related resources for contact improvisation jams is “open for comments” -- i.e., you can edit directly, and your changes will... Continue Reading →

“That lady”: The story of what happened when a woman put up a boundary in the contact improv world by Kathleen Rea

It’s a typical Wednesday night in Toronto. In a third-floor ballroom, some forty people have come to dance together.  A bow lifts and settles on cello strings and one can see the bodies absorb the first awaited note. A couple in the corner are intertwined in a rolling dance in which it is hard to figure out whose body is whose. A high-flying trio graciously makes its way around them. The bodies in this space are engaged in a type of group sensory “listening” that uses all the senses to gauge space and direction of momentum. There are all types of dancers here, from those that dance professionally to those that do it for fun. The ages span nineteen-year-olds to seventy+, and include diverse body types. ....

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